Last edited by Kajile
Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Water utilization and agricultural productivity in China found in the catalog.

Water utilization and agricultural productivity in China

Nishimura, Akio

Water utilization and agricultural productivity in China

positive case studies, 1949-1964.

by Nishimura, Akio

  • 281 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Koyo Shobo Pub. Co. in Kyoto .
Written in English

    Places:
  • China.
    • Subjects:
    • Water resources development -- China.,
    • Agriculture -- China.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 201-213.

      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsTC501 .N57
      The Physical Object
      Pagination219 p.
      Number of Pages219
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5453074M
      LC Control Number73155187

      Techniques include in-field vegetation water use monitoring, remote sensing/earth observation to quantify spatial evapotranspiration patterns, crop and tree water use modelling, and application of agricultural water use impact indices and tools such as water use efficiency/water productivity, water footprints and life cycle analysis. In addition to enhancing agricultural productivity, synthetic nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) fertil-izer application in croplands dramatically alters global nutrient budget, water quality, greenhouse gas balance, and their feedback to the climate system. However, due to the lack of geospatial fertilizer input data, current Earth.

        Water can also move virtually as the production of water intensive food, goods, and services is concentrated in water abundant localities and is traded to water scarce localities. Inter-sectoral water re-allocations and significant shifts of water away from agriculture will also need to be accompanied by improvements in water use efficiency and. The processes of land conversion and agricultural intensification are a significant cause of soil biodiversity loss. The factors controlling land conversion and agricultural intensification, and hence loss of soil biodiversity, are: population increase, national food insufficiency, internal food production imbalances, progressive urbanization, and a growing shortage of land suitable for.

        The study area - the Pearl River Delta Economic Zone is located east longitude °59′42″–°25′18″ and latitude 21°17′36″–23°55′54″, with a total area of about km 2. China’s agriculture is supporting a population of over billion people today, compared to about million in , on a relatively fixed agricul-tural land base and shrinking water supply. The tale of China’s agricultural success in meeting this challenge is two-fold. First, China has enjoyed very strong agricultural productivity growth.


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Water utilization and agricultural productivity in China by Nishimura, Akio Download PDF EPUB FB2

At present, developing agricultural production is limited by the degree to which the water supply occurs in the right amount and at the right moment in the arid regions of China.

Consequently, the urgent challenge before us is the improvement of water management and utilization, which not only is required to ensure the sustainable development. To solve the current water crisis and ensure agricultural sustainable development and food security in China, it is essential to (1) identify the key issues related to highly-efficient water utilization in agriculture (2) understand the mechanisms of water transformation and consumption in grain production at different scales, and (3) improve Cited by:   As a productivity indicator of water resource consumption, AWUE reflects the extent of water resource utilization and its effectiveness in agricultural production.

The calculated efficiency of agricultural water use is shown in Table 2. It can be found that: 1) Overall, the average value of AWUE of 31 provinces in China is less than 1 Cited by:   Progress 10/01/04 to 09/30/05 Outputs In FY, ERS made substantial progress in the project on water scarcity and agricultural production in China.

We have estimated important relationships regarding crop response to lower water deliveries, the adoption of water-saving irrigation technology and the effectiveness of water pricing policies.

While most years China's agricultural production is sufficient to feed the country, in down years, China has to import grain. Due to the shortage of available farm land and an abundance of labor, it might make more sense to import land-extensive crops (such as wheat and rice) and to save China's scarce cropland for high-value export products.

CUM. as compared to 1, CUM in China. Out of the total water s upply, Oxford Book. Hans, V.B. (), Agricultural production can only be sustained on a long term basis if the land. WATER UTILIZATION IN AGRICULTURE- driving the use of water in agricultural production. The rise in demand in domestic China and some 6, m3 Per person in the United States, India‟s accessible, reliable supply of water amounts lo billion m3, or 29 percent of its total water resource.

PDF | Efficient agricultural water use is required for food safety and water alleviation on a global scale. Combining the water footprint and | Find, read and cite all the research you need on. sustainability Article China’s Water Utilization Efficiency: An Analysis with Environmental Considerations Hailiang Ma 1, Chenling Shi 2 and Nan-Ting Chou 3,* 1 Institute for Water Resource Information Statistic and Management, Hohai University, ChangzhouChina; [email protected] CiteScore: ℹ CiteScore: CiteScore measures the average citations received per peer-reviewed document published in this title.

CiteScore values are based on citation counts in a range of four years (e.g. ) to peer-reviewed documents (articles, reviews, conference papers, data papers and book chapters) published in the same four calendar years, divided by the number of. Improved agricultural water use in irrigated and rainfed agriculture will play a key-role in coping with the expected water scarcity stress.

Improving water use or water productivity is often understood in terms of obtaining as much crop as possible per volume of water - "more crop for the drop".

Methods used to monitor agricultural water quality References Regulatory framework Introduction International examples Chinese legislation to control water pollution from agriculture Observations and recommendations for control of water pollution from agriculture.

Water productivity measures how a system converts water into goods and services, it is a measure of the beneficial output in relation to the water actually consumed, the ratio of the net benefits from crop, forestry, fishery, livestock and other mixed agricultural systems to the amount of water used in its production process.

This edited volume analyzes land utilization data from farm surveys taken in China between and This data, which was the foundation for John Lossing Buck’s seminal work Land Utilization in China (), was thought lost to history until rediscovered in The book presents the first modern analyses of agricultural economics in Republican China using Buck’s micro-data, covering.

improve water productivity should be directed at minimizing those losses. Identifying the most promising options is complex and has to take into account environmental, fi nancial, social and health-related considerations.

In general, improving agricultural water productivity, thus freeing. Focusing on both irrigated and rain-fed agriculture, this book gives a state of the art review of the limits and opportunities for improving water productivity in crop production.

It demonstrates how efficiency of water use can be enhanced to maximize yields. Examples from Syria the North China Plain and Oregon USA. Appendix A A Note 1/5(1). The Water Efficiency Improvement in Drought-Affected Provinces Project integrates climate-resilient agricultural practices through a transformational shift in irrigation modernization, including (i) strengthening irrigation management to improve climate resilience, (ii) modernizing irrigation infrastructure, and (iii) supporting efficient on-farm water management practices.

1 day ago  of agricultural water-conserving infrastructure such as plastic mulches, sprinkler irrigation systems and drip irrigation systems. Moreover, it is of great importance to promote the widespread adoption of water-saving technologies in China’s agricultural production system and, especially, encourage farmers to adopt it.

3 Water available for agricultural production 7 Available water 7 Water availability in different regions of India 8 4 Water and agriculture 9 Groundwater and surface water use for agriculture 9 Groundwater utilization for irrigation 9 Irrigation in India 12 Intensity of irrigation Water Use Efficiency and Water Productivity - Proceedings of 4th WASAMED (WAter SAving in MEDiterranean agriculture) Workshop Amman (Jordan), 30 Sept–4 Oct,– Google Scholar Bravo-Ureta, B.

E., & Pinheiro, A. (). Agricultural Productivity and Food Security in the Developing world 55 2. Agricultural productivity and the livelihood of poor people The livelihood of a major proportion of population in the developing world is directly or indirectly connected with agriculture.

World Bank reports that Agriculture is the science and art of cultivating plants and livestock. Agriculture was the key development in the rise of sedentary human civilization, whereby farming of domesticated species created food surpluses that enabled people to live in cities.

The history of agriculture began thousands of years ago. After gathering wild grains beginning at leastyears ago, nascent farmers.Chapter 7.

Nutrient management and water use efficiency for sustainable production of rain-fed crops in the World’s dry areas Bijay Singh, John Ryan, Con Campbell and Roland Kröbel Chapter 8.

Challenges of increasing water and nutrient efficiency in irrigated agriculture Robert L. Mikkelsen, Timothy K. Hartz and M.J. Mohammad Rusan.